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morality

Here’s a research finding that some might call a “silver bullet” for litigation advocacy. We are always looking for nuggets of wisdom in research findings and this is one we think makes a lot of sense for use in court. These researchers wanted to see if people could “be induced to view their own attitudes […]

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Comments Off on Simple Jury Persuasion: “This is really about morality” 

John Oliver recently took on mass media coverage of scientific findings on his HBO show, Last Week Tonight. The result is a searing video mocking the distortions and misinterpretations (and even flat-out lies) about research findings as presented in mass media. Since his episode aired (a link to the video is at the end of […]

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Comments Off on Acetaminophen: Or why you have to read more than the  headlines when it comes to research
be-charismatic

Sometimes we find articles we want to blog about almost immediately and other times we go through a lot of reading to identify something appropriate for a post. But along the way we almost always have tidbits we thought intriguing, resonant of a past post or series of posts, esoteric, or just plain weird. When […]

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Comments Off on Nomophobia reframed, keeping up with science, and sounding charismatic 
Dunning-Kruger-Effect

We’ve written a lot about other kinds of self-appointed experts on your jury (and how to dethrone them) but today’s work is a reflection of another aspect of perceived expert status. When you think you already know a lot about something, you can become closed-minded. You finish the testimony before the witness does. A closed […]

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Comments Off on The Earned Dogmatism Effect: “Oh, I know [all about] this already…” 
250px-Brenda_Lee_1977

The phrase “I’m sorry” always reminds me of then 15-year-old Brenda Lee and her hit single. (That is, in psychology circles, called a tangential aside.) We haven’t written about apology here for a while now and a new study has just published that lists six elements to make your apology optimal. This post is to […]

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Comments Off on I’m sorry: Six elements to make your apology optimal